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Letters, week of Sept. 11

Visiting students pose health risk Sir: Re: Ebola screening at Lambton College First, I wish to compliment our Sarnia Journal writers and staff. Thanks for the local news and events. On reading the Sept.

Visiting students pose health risk

Sir: Re: Ebola screening at Lambton College

First, I wish to compliment our Sarnia Journal writers and staff. Thanks for the local news and events.

On reading the Sept. 4 Ebola article I had neighbours and friend come to me with comments, so I am also speaking for others on this matter.

The college is evidently putting money before health. Whether or not the visiting students are carrying Ebola it is like putting a spark in a room filled with gas … it may blow up and it may not!

If anything ever did happen, the school as well as the government would be to blame and would be held totally accountable. Precautions are extremely important, but are not a guarantee.

Mr. Kardas, the executive director of student services, stated: “The health and safety of our students and staff is foremost.” If this were true, the Nigerian students would not have been accepted this school year while an Ebola outbreak is on in West Africa.

What guarantee is there that through the year they won’t be travelling back and forth with family visits? This is a threat to all, and should not be allowed.

The article noted that all schools in Nigeria were ordered closed recently to prevent the spread of the virus. So what are we doing accepting these students, whether medically watched or not? We are asking for trouble.

So far, there are no cases of Ebola in Canada and the risk remains low. Listening to the news, we can be thankful we live in a country free of such terrible happenings. Why ask for trouble?

I also wish to clarify; this is a health issue and has nothing to do with prejudice.

The problem is post-secondary school has become a financial business. It’s all about money, not health or education. The article stated that Lambton College expects about 3,500 students and 400 to 500 international students this year who “pay higher tuition” than Canadians.

There’s your answer.

This should not be acceptable. I’m sorry for the Nigerian students, but they should not have been allowed to come to Canada this year.

Nancy Wilson

Sarnia

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 College taking big Ebola risk

Sir: Lambton College and its Student Executive have totally lost it.

This comment has nothing to do with education, but about a terrible health risk. There is a reason that schools in Nigeria have recently been closed. The reason students in Nigeria cannot currently go to school is not political, it is for health reasons.

Nigeria is one of a number of Western African nations suffering an extensive Ebola outbreak with over 1,400 dying from the virus.

There is a reason the World Health Organization has pulled their people out of these countries. It is called a High Health Risk.

It is totally beyond me why the Canada Border Services Agency, which intimidates and searches elderly Canadians, is ignoring this health risk landing on our shores.

The powers at be at Lambton College would like you, the public, to ignore this and play the good Samaritan to 55 Nigerian students, bringing them out of Nigeria at the height of an Ebola plague.

The college says it will inspect them and give them kits to check for signs of the virus, and that Bluewater Health is aware of the situation.

That’s fine until one or two students suddenly comes down with Ebola and brings it to our city.

Watch the panic that spreads through Southwestern Ontario after a student is found to have the virus. It should never even get this far.

I think Lambton College will be looking at some hefty class actions if it should spread to the community.

At any other time we would welcome these young students, but this is not the right time or circumstance. Level heads and due diligence ensure that our community’s health and safety should prevail.

Ron Prior

Sarnia